Wondering Out Loud

Is Google+ a consolidation of power

Like most of you, I’ve been following the Google+ talk through the thousands of blog posts that have popped up in the past several days. There is no shortage of Feature to feature comparisons with Facebook, nor is there a lack of opinion and analysis of what Google+ means for the future of Facebook. I did, however, come across a post that considers Google’s latest offering for what it means to the Google as a whole.

Alex Salkever’s column in StreetFight is written from the perspective of hyper-local, but his observations and analysis apply across the spectrum of local to global. Simply put, Salkever posits the notion that, with Google+, Google has added the third and final leg it needs to become a “one-stop-shop for multiple facets of local advertising, all sold through its automated self-service sales machine.” What’s more, the machine will be self-feeding. The other two legs are Google Offers and, of course Adwords.

Individually, each has varying degrees of market penetration, but taken in total the three have a very good chance of creating the Web-dominating force Google has long sought.

There are far too many variables in play to determine when, if ever, the consolidation Salkever envisions will come to pass. But based on the early reviews of Google+, I wouldn’t blame Mark Zuckerberg for feeling a bit nervous at the moment.

July 2, 2011 Posted by | Marketing, Social Media | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blowing Taps for Twitter?

Seems impossible, doesn’t it? Just a few short years after Twitter took the social media world by storm, at least one industry veteran is asking, “is the party over?

Kristine Schachinger of SitesWithoutWalls makes a strong case built on many of the moves Twitter has made recently, not to mention a couple of individual’s moves away from Twitter – Biz Stone and Ev Williams. Buying TweetDeck, shutting down API access, clamping down on third party developers (without whom Twitter would be nothing) all point to Twitter’s inevitable decline into mediocrity according to Schachinger.

Will Twitter go away? Doubtful.It’s become too much a part of the social media fabric to every disappear completely, but there may come a day when it is replaced – however slowly – by “the next big thing”. We don’t know today what that will be, but there’s risk for Twitter is high. After all, management’s moves are creating an insular company that is turning away the very people who made it the cutting edge communications tool it is today. They need somewhere to turn and Stone and Williams just might have a home for them at The Obvious Corporation.

July 1, 2011 Posted by | Social Media | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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